Is There Anything That Can Travel Faster Than Light?

White, a physicist for the aeronautics administration that has been studying a faster-than-light propulsion concept for years, has previously gone public with his research concerning a craft capable of that sort of travel. As far back as 2011, in fact, he attracted the attention of other scientists by publishing a report that set out to prove the feasibility of the F-T-L propulsion concept.

According to Einstein’s theory of relativity, nothing can travel faster than light, but there is some stuff that can beat the speed of light without affecting the laws of physics. Like the expansion of the universe, quantum entanglement, and by decreasing the speed of light (Cherenkov Radiation).

Scientists Confirm Faster than light travel is actually.

Ludicrous Speed. We might have robots and virtual reality, but another sci-fi standby has eluded technological progress: faster-than-light travel.No. it is not possible to travel faster than light. Apart from the non-availability of any mode of transport that can travel at or more than the speed of light, there are other unimaginable.Einstein once called the speed of light “The Universe’s speed limit”. He claimed that traveling faster than the speed of light would violate the causality principle. For the layman, that means cause and effect. An example of this would be a bullet hitting a target before the trigger was even pulled.


Space travel is just one of the possible applications of reaching or exceeding the speed of light. Some scientists are working on doing the same for the purposes of much faster data transfer. Read on to find out about current data speeds and the potential for faster-than-light information.If you flew on a rocket traveling 90 percent of light-speed, the passage of time for you would be halved. Your watch would advance only 10 minutes, while more than 20 minutes would pass for an Earthbound observer. You would also experience some strange visual consequences. One such consequence is called aberration, and it refers to how your whole field of view would shrink down to a tiny.

Rather than exceeding the speed of light within a local reference frame, a spacecraft would traverse distances by contracting space in front of it and expanding space behind it, resulting in effective faster-than-light travel. Objects cannot accelerate to the speed of light within normal spacetime; instead, the Alcubierre drive shifts space around an object so that the object would arrive at.

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If you remove mass from the equation, suddenly light speed becomes possible. And if you make mass negative, you can go faster than a photon, zipping across the Milky Way in the blink of an eye.

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Although Einstein's theories suggest nothing can move faster than the speed of light, two scientists have extended his equations to show what would happen if faster-than-light travel were possible.

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Whenever an object moves in a medium faster than the waves in that medium can travel, it radiates energy in the form of a 'shock wave'. This is observed in airplanes traveling faster than the speed of sound, for example, and it is called the 'sonic boom'. The shockwave has a conic shape, and the faster the airplane, the narrower is the opening angle of the cone. The reason for the formation of.

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Faster-than-light (also superluminal or FTL) communications and travel refer to the propagation of information or matter faster than the speed of light. Under the special theory of relativity, a particle (that has mass) with subluminal velocity needs infinite energy to accelerate to the speed of light, although special relativity does not forbid the existence of particles that travel faster.

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What Happens If You Travel Faster Than The Speed Of Light? Till now, all the amazing assumptions we made like time dilation, length contraction, and getting heavier, are only possible if we follow the theory of relativity. And Einstein’s theories are based on the fact that nothing can travel faster than the light.

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The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles per second (299,792 kilometers per second), and in theory nothing can travel faster than light. In miles per hour, light speed is, well, a lot.

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Light, when moving through just about any medium, is slower than the universal constant we know as the speed of light. The difference is negligible through air, but light can be slowed down considerably through other media, including glass, which makes up the core of most fiber optic cabling. The refractive index of a medium is the speed of light in a vacuum divided by the speed of light in.

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Einstein said that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. You have probably heard something like that. But is this really correct? This is what we will talk about today. You have probably heard something like that.

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But, there are those in the scientific community that do believe that faster than light travel is possible, and one team may have just accidentally stumbled onto faster than light travel.

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